Archives for category: Print

A few days before Obama announced his executive actions on immigration, Angela Navarro, an undocumented woman from Honduras, moved with her husband and two children into a North Philadelphia church. She was hoping ICE wouldn’t follow her there. Here’s my story for Al Jazeera America.

Angela Navarro and her daughter officially enter sanctuary at West Kensington Ministry in North Philadelphia on Tuesday. Photo by Michael Bryant for Al Jazeera America.

Angela Navarro and her daughter officially enter sanctuary at West Kensington Ministry in North Philadelphia on Tuesday. Photo by Michael Bryant for Al Jazeera America.

Nyi Nyi Aung was the person who got me interested in Burma in the first place. He’s a democracy activist who’s spent most of the past 25 years living in exile in Thailand and the U.S. He was arrested trying to enter Burma in 2009. I covered his trial and imprisonment, and met him for the first time a few days after he was released and returned to his home outside of Washington, D.C.

It was a bit surreal to, four years later, spend a day with him openly exploring Yangon, seeing spots important to the story of the 1988 uprising and talking about what’s happening in the country today. Here’s the article I wrote for Al Jazeera America about that day.

Nyi Nyi Aung outside of a childhood home in Yangon in July, 2013.

Nyi Nyi Aung outside of a childhood home in Yangon in July, 2013.

Seamstress in a village in Myanmar's Irrawaddy Delta. Photo: Kaung Htet

Seamstress in a village in Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta. Photo: Kaung Htet

I was thrilled to be a part of this Open Hands Initiative/Global Post fellowship in June that sent 10 U.S. journalists over to Myanmar to work with 10 Burmese journalists, under the watchful eye of a bunch of seasoned foreign correspondents and Myanmar experts.

Here’s  the report that we put together for Global Post; lots of good stuff in there. Even better was getting to spend a few weeks exploring a country I’m fascinated by with new colleagues, and to see that country’s young media already thriving and in very capable hands, including those of my new friends at The Myanmar Times, RFA Burmese, and BBC Burmese.

Aung San Suu Kyi at a dinner we had with her on our final night in the country. Photo: Natalie Keyssar

Aung San Suu Kyi at a dinner we had with her on our final night in the country. Behind her are  Kaung Htet, who took the photo at the top of this post; Sarah Fitzpatrick, a producer for CBS; and me. The photo’s by Natalie Keyssar, another allstar.

A few small things I wrote for The World‘s blog while I was in Myanmar–

One on chasing rumors of demonstrations, and finding only a scrum of reporters.

One on international ATM cards finally being accepted in the country, and my failed attempts to make use of this fact.

And one on Yangon’s lovely quality of being a bit trapped in time, a quality that I think it’s now quickly shedding.

AGD

Asia Green Development Bank seen through spires at Sule Pagoda. AGD is owned by Tay Za, who Forbes called “one of Burma’s richest tycoons.”

One of my dispatches from the 2012 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

Searching for a parade.

Here‘s the post I wrote for Guernica about video art responses to the violence in Syria.

Thanks to the super-talented Glenna Gordon for putting me in touch with the Guernica gang, and to Kinan Azmeh for turning me onto the subject in the first place.

The This American Life-edited section of the Times magazine’s annual “The Lives They Lived” issue that I worked on is online now. My contribution here. Am loving the other stuff the TAL folks came up with.

Hard copies will be in the paper on Christmas day, possibly making it difficult to come by if you don’t have a subscription or live in New York City, where the magazine comes in Saturday’s paper.

The Lives They Lived 2011

The Lives They Lived 2011

After drifting in editorial limbo for a few weeks, a profile I wrote of a Burmese diplomat was rushed to web yesterday. The impetus was Obama’s announcement that Secretary Clinton would visit Myanmar in December–the country was all of a sudden all up in the headlines. The profile is about Kyaw Win, who served the Burmese Foreign Ministry for 31 years before resigning from his post at the D.C. embassy in July and applying for asylum.

Here’s the story–a slightly updated version (which I’m currently procrastinating from finishing) will be in Monday’s paper Friday’s paper the paper one of these days.

My story about social media watchdogging experiment NewsTrust Baltimore is (finally) up at CJR.org. Julia had no problem picking out the sentence in here that I was most proud of.

Three years ago, for Martin Luther King, Jr. day, I convinced The Nation to let me interview Taylor Branch, chronicler of the King era and a person from whom I’ve drawn a lot of inspiration. At the time, Branch was deep into working on The Clinton Tapes, although our conversation only touched on that in a couple of tangential ways.

Here’s the interview.

In looking back at that interview today, King Day 2011, it strikes me both how scattered my questions are–even in heavily condensed form–and, despite that, how easily Branch reaches grand, eloquent heights in universalizing King’s message.

And this:

I think we’re still in an era that wants to pigeonhole Dr. King as somebody who’s about “I have a dream” and the end of segregation. Because people are more comfortable with that, they want to see another race leader, not a democratic force.