Narendra Modi, India’s newly-elected Prime Minster, rolled through New York this weekend, part statesman, part rockstar. To some he’s a cause for concern. Here’s my story for The World about his appearance at Madison Square Garden, and the local community’s response to it.

#ModiInAmerica

There were some new faces at the head of the massive People’s Climate March on Sunday–among them groups of immigrants. Here’s my story for The World.SystemChange

A filmmaker, an English prof, and a military analyst look for the message and the craft in ISIS propaganda videos. My story for The World.

Logo of Al Hayat, ISIS's media organization.

Logo of Al Hayat, ISIS’s media organization.

Two dispatches from my brief stint at The World‘s sports desk*. One on Nine Man, an alternative take on volleyball that grew up in Chinatowns in New York and elsewhere.

Serving

And one on a group of runners who come from around the world to run around one block in Queens for a month-and-a-half.

Prasat*There is, to the best of my knowledge, no sports desk at The World.

A story for The World on New York City’s aging immigrant population.

A computer class The Bronx Korean American Senior Citizen Association on Grand Concourse in the Bronx.

A computer class The Bronx Korean American Senior Citizen Association on Grand Concourse in the Bronx.

A Buddhist marriage ceremony I stumbled into in Yangon.

Buddhist monks gathered at the home of Chit San Oo and Makhin San Yee to give the newlywed couple a wedding blessing.

Buddhist monks gathered at the home of Chit San Oo and Makhin San Yee to give the newlywed couple a wedding blessing.

Nyi Nyi Aung was the person who got me interested in Burma in the first place. He’s a democracy activist who’s spent most of the past 25 years living in exile in Thailand and the U.S. He was arrested trying to enter Burma in 2009. I covered his trial and imprisonment, and met him for the first time a few days after he was released and returned to his home outside of Washington, D.C.

It was a bit surreal to, four years later, spend a day with him openly exploring Yangon, seeing spots important to the story of the 1988 uprising and talking about what’s happening in the country today. Here’s the article I wrote for Al Jazeera America about that day.

Nyi Nyi Aung outside of a childhood home in Yangon in July, 2013.

Nyi Nyi Aung outside of a childhood home in Yangon in July, 2013.

In December of 2012, I spent Shan New Years on the Burma/Thai border, talking to Shan refugees in a camp there.

A large Buddha sits at the top a hill in Piang Luang township. Shan New Year's is celebrated on the hillside below it, and the Thailand-Myanmar border is a few hundred yards beyond it.

A large Buddha sits at the top of a hill in Piang Luang township. Shan New Year is celebrated on the hillside below it, and the Thailand-Myanmar border is a few hundred yards beyond it. Koung Jor is on the next hill over.

01-1988 GP B&W photo file

Photo courtesy of Gaye Paterson

The folks at Radio Diaries make hands down some of the best radio out there, and it was a real joy to get to work with them on this documentary about the 1988 popular uprisings in Burma. I started learning about these uprisings four years ago while I was working on the first story I ever did about that country. And 1988 came up in nearly every story I did on Burma after that–so much that’s happened in the 25 years since then has roots in those months.

Seamstress in a village in Myanmar's Irrawaddy Delta. Photo: Kaung Htet

Seamstress in a village in Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta. Photo: Kaung Htet

I was thrilled to be a part of this Open Hands Initiative/Global Post fellowship in June that sent 10 U.S. journalists over to Myanmar to work with 10 Burmese journalists, under the watchful eye of a bunch of seasoned foreign correspondents and Myanmar experts.

Here’s  the report that we put together for Global Post; lots of good stuff in there. Even better was getting to spend a few weeks exploring a country I’m fascinated by with new colleagues, and to see that country’s young media already thriving and in very capable hands, including those of my new friends at The Myanmar Times, RFA Burmese, and BBC Burmese.

Aung San Suu Kyi at a dinner we had with her on our final night in the country. Photo: Natalie Keyssar

Aung San Suu Kyi at a dinner we had with her on our final night in the country. Behind her are  Kaung Htet, who took the photo at the top of this post; Sarah Fitzpatrick, a producer for CBS; and me. The photo’s by Natalie Keyssar, another allstar.

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